Lyerly

Lyerly was the successor to Melville and Glenwood, once thriving communities in the same general area as Lyerly. Angus McLeod is considered the father of Lyerly. In 1888, he donated the land for the Chattanooga, Rome and Columbus Railroad Depot. The lots for the town were laid out on McLeod’s land and today the city park bears his name. The town is named for Captain Charles A. Lyerly, an influential Chattanooga banker.

Lyerly Photo Archive

Students at Lyerly School were part of the Home Guard during World War II
Students at Lyerly School were part of the Home Guard during World War II
Chattooga Corn Club, a precursor to the 4- H program
Chattooga Corn Club, a precursor to the 4- H program
The Holland House near the Alabama line was built around 1886.Unfortunately the house burned in the 1980’s
The Holland House near the Alabama line was built around 1886.Unfortunately the house burned in the 1980’s
The Strain Home in 1910. Located near Lyerly, it was later known as the Weesner Home
The Strain Home in 1910. Located near Lyerly, it was later known as the Weesner Home
Home Demonstration Clubs were once popular. They were sponsored by the Univ. of Ga. Extension Service and helped women with food preservation, cooking, sewing, etc.
Home Demonstration Clubs were once popular. They were sponsored by the Univ. of Ga. Extension Service and helped women with food preservation, cooking, sewing, etc.
Plowing the garden  at one of the oldest houses in county, the Price House out from Lyerly. This 1930’s photo shows a family trying to survive the great depression.
Plowing the garden at one of the oldest houses in county, the Price House out from Lyerly. This 1930’s photo shows a family trying to survive the great depression.